Belet Below the Haze

Belet Below the Haze

The Cassini spacecraft peers down through the hazy atmosphere of Saturn’s moon Titan to view the dark region called Belet. This image was captured using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 938 nanometers. The large region called Belet has a low albedo, meaning it reflects little light. See Map of Titan – February 2009 and Titanic Deluge to learn more. This view looks toward the trailing hemisphere of Titan. North on Titan (5,150 kilometers, or 3,200 miles across) is up. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 23, 2011. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.6 million kilometers (990,000 miles) from Titan and at a Sun-Titan-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 14 degrees. Image scale is 9 kilometers (6 miles) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging team is based at the Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov or http://www.nasa.gov/cassini . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Space Calendar August 31 – September 6 2011

Space related activities and anniversaries for August 31 – September 6 2011. Fetched live every week from NASA JPL

If you want the complete list going more than a year ahead then see the Space Calendar at NASA JPL.

Full View of Hyperion

Full View of Hyperion

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft obtained this unprocessed image of Saturn’s moon Hyperion on Aug. 25, 2011. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Hyperion — Raw Image 2

Hyperion -- Raw Image 2

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft obtained this unprocessed image of Saturn’s moon Hyperion on Aug. 25, 2011. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Hyperion — Raw Image 3

Hyperion -- Raw Image 3

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft obtained this unprocessed image of Saturn’s moon Hyperion on Aug. 25, 2011. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Dione Decoration

Dione Decoration

Saturn’s third largest moon, Dione, appears like a solitary ornament suspended above the rings in this Cassini spacecraft view. Lit terrain seen here is on the leading hemisphere of Dione (1,123 kilometers, or 698 miles across). North on Dione is up and rotated 1 degree to the right. The rings are closer to Cassini in this view, with Dione more distant. This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 11, 2011. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 3.2 million kilometers (2 million miles) from Dione and at a Sun-Dione-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 85 degrees. Image scale is 19 kilometers (12 miles) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging team is based at the Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov or http://www.nasa.gov/cassini . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Space Calendar August 24 – August 30 2011

Space related activities and anniversaries for August 24 – August 30 2011. Fetched live every week from NASA JPL

If you want the complete list going more than a year ahead then see the Space Calendar at NASA JPL.

Dramatic Helene

Dramatic Helene

Saturn’s small, irregularly shaped moon Helene is strikingly illuminated in this close view captured by Cassini during the spacecraft’s June 18, 2011, flyby. Although it is not visible at this exposure, the planet actually fills the dark background of this image of Helene. See High-Res Helene for another close-up from this encounter. This view looks toward the anti-Saturn side of Helene (33 kilometers, or 21 miles across). North on Helene is up. Lit terrain on the right is on the leading hemisphere while lit terrain at the top of the image surrounds the north pole. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 11,000 kilometers (7,000 miles) from Helene and at a Sun-Helene-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 151 degrees. Image scale is 67 meters (220 feet) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging team is based at the Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov or http://www.nasa.gov/cassini . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Space Calendar August 17 – August 23 2011

Space related activities and anniversaries for August 17 – August 23 2011. Fetched live every week from NASA JPL

If you want the complete list going more than a year ahead then see the Space Calendar at NASA JPL.

Alien World is Blacker than Coal

Alien World is Blacker than Coal

Astronomers have discovered the darkest known exoplanet – a distant, Jupiter-sized gas giant known as TrES-2b. Their measurements show that TrES-2b reflects less than one percent of the sunlight falling on it, making it blacker than coal or any planet or moon in our solar system.

“TrES-2b is considerably less reflective than black acrylic paint, so it’s truly an alien world,” said astronomer David Kipping of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), lead author on the paper reporting the research.

In our solar system, Jupiter is swathed in bright clouds of ammonia that reflect more than a third of the sunlight reaching it. In contrast, TrES-2b (which was discovered in 2006 by the Trans-Atlantic Exoplanet Survey, or TrES) lacks reflective clouds due to its high temperature.

[SOURCE: www.cfa.harward.edu]