Titan Flyby (T-77) — June 20, 2011

Titan Flyby (T-77) -- June 20, 2011

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Bright Moons

Bright Moons

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Helene, Close up

Helene, Close up

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Crescent Helene

Crescent Helene

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Another View of Helene

Another View of Helene

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Space Calendar June 20 – June 26 2011

Space related activities and anniversaries for June 20 – June 26 2011. Fetched live every week from NASA JPL

If you want the complete list going more than a year ahead then see the Space Calendar at NASA JPL.

Cassini Images Hall of Fame

Cassini Images Hall of Fame

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Sliver of Enceladus

Sliver of Enceladus

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Space Calendar June 13 – June 19 2011

Space related activities and anniversaries for June 13 – June 19 2011. Fetched live every week from NASA JPL

If you want the complete list going more than a year ahead then see the Space Calendar at NASA JPL.

New Supernova Remnant Lights Up

New Supernova Remnant Lights Up

In 1987, light from an exploding star in a neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud, reached Earth. Named Supernova 1987A, it was the closest supernova explosion witnessed in almost 400 years, allowing astronomers to study it in unprecedented detail as it evolves.

Today a team of astronomers announced that the supernova debris, which has faded over the years, is brightening. This shows that a different power source has begun to light the debris, and marks the transition from a supernova to a supernova remnant.

“Supernova 1987A has become the youngest supernova remnant visible to us,” said Robert Kirshner of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA).

Kirshner leads a long-term study of SN 1987A with NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Since its launch in 1990, Hubble has provided a continuous record of the changes in SN 1987A.

[SOURCE: www.cfa.harward.edu]