Bright Slice

Bright Slice

Saturn’s brightly lit rings slice across this Cassini spacecraft picture taken before a backdrop of the planet’s clouds. The shadow of the rings can be seen cast upon the planet in the lower right of the image. This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 11, 2010 using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 938 nanometers. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.9 million kilometers (1.2 million miles) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 77 degrees. Image scale is 11 kilometers (7 miles) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Light on the Dark Side

Light on the Dark Side

Sunlight scattering through the periphery of Titan’s atmosphere reaches Cassini as the spacecraft’s camera is pointed at the dark side of the moon. A detached, high-altitude global haze layer encircles the moon. See Titan’s Halo to see an enhanced-color view and learn more about why the detached haze layer is best studied in the ultraviolet. This view looks toward the leading hemisphere of Titan (5,150 kilometers, or 3,200 miles across). North on Titan is up. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 2, 2010 using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of ultraviolet light centered at 338 nanometers. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.5 million kilometers (932,000 miles) from Titan and at a Sun-Titan-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 153 degrees. Image scale is 9 kilometers (6 miles) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Flying Over Dione

Flying Over Dione

The Cassini spacecraft swooped in for a close-up of the cratered, fractured surface of Saturn’s moon Dione in this image taken during the spacecraft’s Jan. 27, 2010, non-targeted flyby. Cassini came within about 45,000 kilometers (28,000 miles) of the moon during this flyby, and this image was acquired at a distance of approximately 46,000 kilometers (29,000 miles). See Wispy Marble for an older, closer view of Dione. This view looks toward the leading hemisphere of Dione (1,123 kilometers, or 698 miles across). North on Dione is up. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera. The view was acquired at a Sun-Dione-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 108 degrees. Image scale is 270 meters (886 feet) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Shadow from Unseen Moon

Shadow from Unseen Moon

The shadow of the moon Enceladus darkens a small portion of the swirling clouds on Saturn. Enceladus itself is not visible in this view. This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible red light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Nov. 24, 2009. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.7 million kilometers (1.1 million miles) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 86 degrees. Image scale is 98 kilometers (61 miles) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Space Calendar June 28 – July 4 2010

Space related activities and anniversaries for June 28 – July 4 2010. Fetched live every week from NASA JPL

If you want the complete list going more than a year ahead then see the Space Calendar at NASA JPL.

Cutting Off Rhea

Cutting Off Rhea

Saturn’s rings and small moon Prometheus obscure the Cassini spacecraft’s view of the planet’s second largest moon, Rhea. Prometheus, which orbits in the Roche Division between the main rings and the thin F ring, can be seen just below the center of the image, in front of Rhea. Lit terrain seen here is on the anti-Saturn side of Prometheus (86 kilometers, or 53 miles across) and mostly on the leading hemisphere of Rhea (1,528 kilometers, or 949 miles across). This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible red light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 9, 2010. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1 million kilometers (621,000 miles) from Prometheus and 1.6 million kilometers (994,000 miles) from Rhea. Image scale is 6 kilometers (4 miles) per pixel on Prometheus and 10 kilometers (6 miles) per pixel on Rhea. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Enceladus at Low Phase

Enceladus at Low Phase

The highly reflective surface of Saturn’s moon Enceladus is almost completely illuminated in this Cassini spacecraft image taken at a low phase angle. The phase angle, or Sun-Enceladus-spacecraft angle, for this view is 2 degrees. Enceladus is one of the most reflective bodies in the solar system because it is constantly coated by fresh, white ice particles. See Occulting Enceladus and Icy Enceladus to learn more. This view looks toward the trailing hemisphere of Enceladus (504 kilometers, or 313 miles across). North on Enceladus is up. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 423,000 kilometers (263,000 miles) from Enceladus. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Oct. 14, 2009. Image scale is 3 kilometers (2 miles) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Hubble captures bubbles and baby stars

Hubble captures bubbles and baby stars

A spectacular new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image — one of the largest ever released of a star-forming region — highlights N11, part of a complex network of gas clouds and star clusters within our neighbouring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. This region of energetic star formation is one of the most active in the nearby Universe.

The Large Magellanic Cloud contains many bright bubbles of glowing gas. One of the largest and most spectacular has the name LHA 120-N 11, from its listing in a catalogue compiled by the American astronomer and astronaut Karl Henize in 1956, and is informally known as N11. Close up, the billowing pink clouds of glowing gas make N11 resemble a puffy swirl of fairground candy floss. From further away, its distinctive overall shape led some observers to nickname it the Bean Nebula. The dramatic and colourful features visible in the nebula are the telltale signs of star formation. N11 is a well-studied region that extends over 1000 light-years. It is the second largest star-forming region within the Large Magellanic Cloud and has produced some of the most massive stars known.

[SOURCE: spacetelescope.org]

Titan Flyby (T-70) – June 21, 2010

Titan Flyby (T-70) - June 21, 2010

Cassini flies to within a mere 880 kilometers (547 miles) of Titan’s surface during the T-70 flyby, the lowest in the entire mission. The cloud-skimming altitude and orientation (closest approach is in the dayside ionosphere) make this the absolute top priority flyby for the magnetometer (MAG) team, which is searching for evidence of a possible Titanian magnetic field. The flyby ends on a high note as the ultra violet imaging spectrograph (UVIS) instrument captures a stellar occultation outbound from Titan. + View Flyby Page

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Dione and Ghostly Titan

Dione and Ghostly Titan

The surface of Saturn’s moon Dione is rendered in crisp detail against a hazy, ghostly Titan. A portion of the ”wispy” terrain of Dione’s trailing hemisphere can be seen on the right (see Wispy Marble). Also visible in this image are hints of atmospheric banding around Titan’s north pole. To learn more about the northern bands, see Bands of Titan and Northern Bands. This view looks toward the Saturn-facing hemisphere of Dione (1,123 kilometers, or 698 miles across) and Titan (5,150 kilometers, or 3,200 miles across). The image was taken in visible blue light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 10, 2010. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.8 million kilometers (1.1 million miles) from Dione and 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles) from Titan. Scale in the original image was 11 kilometers (7 miles) per pixel on Dione and 16 kilometers (10 miles) on Titan. The image has been magnified by a factor of 1.5 and contrast-enhanced to aid visibility. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]