Amateur photography of Saturn by Christopher Go

Amateur photography of Saturn by Christopher Go

Amateur astronomer Christopher Go took this image of a storm on Saturn from his veranda in Cebu, Philippines, on March 13, 2010. The arrow indicates the location of the storm, around 40 degrees south latitude. Members of Cassini’s composite infrared spectrometer team took an interest in the photograph, creating a callout that highlights the storm and outlines in red the areas where the spectrometer gathered data. Credit: C.Go and NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Amateur photography of Saturn by Anthony Wesley

Amateur photography of Saturn by Anthony Wesley

Amateur astronomer Anthony Wesley obtained this image of a storm on Saturn from his backyard telescope in Murrumbateman, Australia, on March 22, 2010. He sent it to scientists working with NASA’s Cassini spacecraft the next day. Credit: A. Wesley

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Shadows from the Waves

Shadows from the Waves

Shadows are cast by Daphnis and the moon’s attendant edge waves in this Cassini spacecraft image taken about a month and a half before the Saturn’s August 2009 equinox. Daphnis (8 kilometers, or 5 miles across) appears as a tiny bright dot in the Keeler Gap of the A ring near the center of the image. The moon has an inclined orbit and its gravitational pull perturbs the orbits of the particles of the A ring forming the Keeler Gap’s edge. It also sculpts the edge into waves having both horizontal (radial) and out-of-plane components. Material on the inner edge of the gap orbits faster than the moon so that the waves there lead the moon in its orbit. Material on the outer edge moves slower than the moon, so waves there trail the moon. See Wavy Shadows to learn more about this process. The Encke Gap of the A ring, wider than the Keeler Gap, can be seen on the left of the image. The thin F ring is on the far right. Numerous background stars are visible elongated by the motion of the spacecraft during the exposure. The novel illumination geometry that accompanies equinox lowers the sun’s angle to the ringplane, significantly darkens the rings, and causes out-of-plane structures to look anomalously bright and cast shadows across the rings. These scenes are possible only during the few months before and after Saturn’s equinox, which occurs only once in about 15 Earth years. Before and after equinox, Cassini’s cameras have spotted not only the predictable shadows of some of Saturn’s moons (see Across Resplendent Rings), but also the shadows of newly revealed vertical structures in the rings themselves (see A Small Find Near Equinox). This view looks toward the southern, unilluminated side of the rings from about 53 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 28, 2009. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.5 million kilometers (932,000 miles) from Daphnis and at a Sun-Daphnis-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 74 degrees. Image scale is 9 kilometers (6 miles) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Space Calendar May 3 – May 9 2010

Space related activities and anniversaries for May 3 – May 9 2010. Fetched live every week from NASA JPL

If you want the complete list going more than a year ahead then see the Space Calendar at NASA JPL.

Enceladus ‘E9’ Flyby: Plume-crossing, Gravity-measuring Encounter

Enceladus 'E9' Flyby: Plume-crossing, Gravity-measuring Encounter

On this flyby, the Cassini Radio Science Subsystem (RSS) tracks Enceladus through a close pass to determine the nature of the interior beneath the south polar hot spot. + View Flyby Page

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

West of the Probe

West of the Probe

The Cassini spacecraft peers through Titan’s atmosphere at the region called Adiri, west of the landing site of the Huygens probe on the anti-Saturn side of the moon. See Titan’s Variety and Titan’s Surface to learn more. This view is centered on terrain at 22 degrees south latitude, 209 degrees west longitude. North on Titan (5,150 kilometers, or 3,200 miles across) is up and rotated 36 degrees to the right. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Dec. 12, 2009 using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 938 nanometers. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 130,000 kilometers (81,000 miles) from Titan. Image scale is 766 meters (2,513 feet) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Woven Shadow

Woven Shadow

Part of the shadow of Saturn’s moon Epimetheus appears as if it has been woven through the planet’s rings in this Cassini image taken about a month and a half before the planet’s August 2009 equinox. Epimetheus itself is not shown, but the moon casts a shadow whose appearance varies based on the density of particles across the rings. See Shadow from the Dark Side and Weaving a Shadow to learn more. The novel illumination geometry that accompanies equinox lowers the sun’s angle to the ringplane, significantly darkens the rings, and causes out-of-plane structures to look anomalously bright and cast shadows across the rings. These scenes are possible only during the few months before and after Saturn’s equinox, which occurs only once in about 15 Earth years. Before and after equinox, Cassini’s cameras have spotted not only the predictable shadows of some of Saturn’s moons (see Across Resplendent Rings), but also the shadows of newly revealed vertical structures in the rings themselves (see A Small Find Near Equinox). This view looks toward the northern, unilluminated side of the rings from about 45 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 26, 2009. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 943,000 kilometers (586,000 miles) from Saturn. Image scale is 5 kilometers (3 miles) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Hyperion’s South

Hyperion's South

Myriad shadows cover the pitted surface of Saturn’s small moon Hyperion in this Cassini spacecraft image, which shows the moon’s south pole on the right. See Chiseled Away to learn how these pits are created on low-density Hyperion (270 kilometers, or 168 miles across). To watch a movie of this tumbling moon, see Rough and Tumble Hyperion. Lit terrain seen here is on the anti-Saturn side and the south polar area of Hyperion. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Nov. 8, 2009. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 834,000 kilometers (518,000 miles) from Hyperion and at a Sun-Hyperion-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 105 degrees. Scale in the original image was 5 kilometers (3 miles) per pixel. The image was contrast enhanced and magnified by a factor of two to enhance the visibility of surface features. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Peekaboo Rhea

Peekaboo Rhea

Saturn’s second largest moon Rhea pops in and out of view behind the planet’s rings in this image from the Cassini spacecraft, which includes the smaller moon Epimetheus. Rhea (1,528 kilometers, or 949 miles across) is on the right of the image, behind the rings as seen by Cassini. Epimetheus (113 kilometers, or 70 miles across) is on the left of the image and is also beyond the rings. Telesto (25 kilometers, or 16 miles across) is visible in the top right and has been brightened by a factor 1.5 relative to Rhea and the rings. The bright speck in the top left of the image is a star. This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ringplane. Lit terrain seen on Rhea is on leading hemisphere of that moon. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on March 8, 2010. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from Epimetheus and 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles) from Rhea. Image scale is 14 kilometers (9 miles) per pixel on Epimetheus and 16 kilometers (10 miles) per pixel on Rhea. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]

Mimas’ Stretched Shadow

Mimas' Stretched Shadow

The shadow of Saturn’s moon Mimas is elongated across the planet in this Cassini spacecraft image. The moon itself is not shown, but the shadow appears just above the ringplane on the right of the image. This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from about 1 degree above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible red light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Oct. 18, 2009. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.9 million kilometers (1.2 million miles) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 92 degrees. Image scale is 112 kilometers (70 miles) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org . Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

[SOURCE: saturn.jpl.nasa.gov]