Space Calendar June 1 – June 7 2009

Space related activities and anniversaries for June 1 – June 7 2009. Fetched live every week from NASA JPL

If you want the complete list going more than a year ahead then see the Space Calendar at NASA JPL.

Space Calendar May 25 – May 31 2009

Space related activities and anniversaries for May 25 – May 31 2009. Fetched live every week from NASA JPL

If you want the complete list going more than a year ahead then see the Space Calendar at NASA JPL.

Astronauts Say Goodbye to Hubble

[SOURCE: discovery.com]

Hubble Telescope Gets New Gyroscopes

Spacewalking astronauts had to install a refurbished pair of gyroscopes in the Hubble Space Telescope on Friday after one of the brand new ones refused to go in.

Hubble Telescope Gets New Gyroscopes

The struggle had NASA on edge for about two hours. The gyroscopes are needed to point the 19-year-old observatory, and getting them in was the top priority of the repair mission.

It was the second spacewalk in as many days for the Atlantis astronauts. On Thursday, another two-man team installed a powerful new camera and a computer data unit, after struggling with a stubborn bolt. NASA had hoped for an easier, less stressful spacewalk, but instead had to endure more drama.

[SOURCE: discovery.com]

Space Calendar May 18 – May 24 2009

Space related activities and anniversaries for May 18 – May 24 2009. Fetched live every week from NASA JPL

If you want the complete list going more than a year ahead then see the Space Calendar at NASA JPL.

Shuttle Crew to ‘Grab’ Hubble

Atlantis’ astronauts reached out and grabbed the Hubble Space Telescope on Wednesday, setting the stage for five days of treacherous spacewalking repairs in a lofty orbit littered with space junk.

Shuttle Crew to 'Grab' Hubble

It was the first time anyone had seen the orbiting observatory up close in seven years.

“Hubble has arrived on board Atlantis,” commander Scott Altman said.

“It’s great to be back with the telescope,” replied Mission Control.

Robot arm operator Megan McArthur used the 50-foot boom to seize the school bus-sized telescope as the two spacecraft sailed 350 miles above Australia.

[SOURCE: discovery.com]

Space Readies for Launch to Hubble

Space shuttle Atlantis is on its way to the Hubble Space Telescope.

Space Readies for Launch to Hubble

Atlantis and seven astronauts blasted off Monday on a mission that has more risks than usual. It is NASA’s final trip to Hubble and comes after a seven-month delay.

Atlantis and its crew were supposed to fly to Hubble last fall, but the telescope broke down.

The telescope is in need of new equipment and repairs, and the shuttle should arrive at the orbiting observatory Wednesday.

[SOURCE: discovery.com]

Hubble: From Joke to Cherished Eye in Space

Using the power of pictures, the Hubble Space Telescope has snapped away at the mystery of the universe.

Hubble: From Joke to Cherished Eye in Space

For 19 years, Hubble has shown the epic violence of crashing galaxies, spied on the birth and death of stars, taught cosmic lessons, and even provided comic relief.

In Hubble’s photos, believers witness the hand of God, nonbelievers see astronomy in action, and artists discover galaxies worthy of galleries.

[SOURCE: discovery.com]

Hubble Photographs a Planetary Nebula to Commemorate Decommissioning of Super Camera

May 10, 2009: The Hubble community bids farewell to the soon-to-be decommissioned Wide
Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. In
tribute to Hubble’s longest-running optical camera, planetary nebula K 4-55
has been imaged as WFPC2’s final “pretty picture.”

Hubble Photographs a Planetary Nebula to Commemorate Decommissioning of Super Camera

[SOURCE: hubblesite.org]

Refined Hubble Constant Narrows Possible Explanations for Dark Energy

Whatever dark energy is, explanations for it have less wiggle room following a Hubble Space Telescope observation that has refined the measurement of the universe’s present expansion rate to a precision where the error is smaller than five percent. The new value for the expansion rate, known as the Hubble constant, or H0 (after Edwin Hubble who first measured the expansion of the universe nearly a century ago), is 74.2 kilometers per second per megaparsec (error margin of ± 3.6). The results agree closely with an earlier measurement gleaned from Hubble of 72 ± 8 km/sec/megaparsec, but are now more than twice as precise.

[SOURCE: hubblesite.org]